Common Core & Core Arts Standards in Arkansas

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English language arts and math were the subjects chosen for the Common Core State Standards because they are areas upon which students build skill sets that are used in other subjects. Students must learn to read, write, speak, listen, and use language effectively in a variety of content areas, so the standards specify the literacy skills and understandings required for college and career readiness in multiple disciplines. It is important to note that the literacy standards in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects for grades 6–12 are meant to supplement content standards in those areas, not replace them. States determine how to incorporate these standards into their standards for those subjects or adopt them as content area literacy standards.   Source

http://www.corestandards.org/read-the-standards/

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How are standards different from curriculum?

FOUR   Artistic Processes          ELEVEN Anchor Standards.

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Music Model Cornerstone Assessment: High School Ensembles Music_MCA_HS_PerformingScreen Shot 2014-06-25 at 7.17.43 PM

 

“Within Music classes teachers support the Common Core standards for English Language Arts in a variety of ways.  Depending upon the grade level and the type of music class, students may discuss and evaluate the music of historically significant composers, the music of a particular culture, as well as music from diverse styles, genres and performing artists.  Students are also called upon to self-assess and evaluate their individual performance or the performance of their ensemble in an articulate manner using relevant and appropriate vocabulary.  This may be done verbally or in writing. Students are encouraged to develop and use a vocabulary that evidences an understanding of the elements of music as well as the broader knowledge base they have gained from the study of all content areas.  In class “Word Walls” are employed to support student learning of content specific vocabulary.

Music classes may occasionally include lessons which require the close reading of informational texts.  These lessons facilitate student development of vocabulary and comprehension skills and require students to answer text related questions and compose essays employing information from the text.

In class discussions and informational text may also relate how and why an historical period or cultural perspective influenced the composers and music that was created in that setting or how music and musicians influenced historical events.  Students may also be given assignments which require the use of library or internet based resources to research and acquire background information on a musician/composer, a particular culture, a current trend, or an historical period and how they relate to the child’s study of music in school.

Interestingly, aptitude in math has often been correlated to a strong musical aptitude.  Within the music curriculum the most obvious link to the Common Core for Math is the extensive use of fractions within the notation and reading of rhythm.  Our lessons in music most definitely support the development of a strong understanding of fractions on the part of students.  Research has also shown that mastery of fractions is a significant predictor of later success in Algebra.  Music study also supports student understanding of proportions, percentages, patterns, and sequences through the analysis of rhythm, melodic contour, and musical form.

Overall, the strategies employed in our music classrooms help the children to see the connections among the various areas of study and to develop a broad knowledge base that supports their learning and understanding in every content area as well as their preparation for future careers or college study.” Hicksville Public Schools, NY


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Example of a Creative activity in a choral class.
Construct a warm-up chorale
1. Students will compose in small groups a melody of 8, 12, or 16 measures. Can be done as a whole class, section, small group, and/or as an individual.
2.  Class sings the melody chosen using projector or printed parts.
3.  Students as a member of a larger group or individually will add one harmony part then rehearse it with a group.
4.  Add parts and rehearse.
5.  Group can share compositions with other groups/classes.  Publish notation on class blog.  Put performance on youtube or Facebook.  This can also be an opportunity to discuss copyright.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.6
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11-12 texts and topics.
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Scat the 12-Bar Blues
1.   Students will discuss a video performance of someone singing scat.
2.  Students can take turns leading the class in scat imitation sessions. Some may wish to play guitar, bass, etc. You can also make a loop on GarageBand or Loopy, etc.  to accompany the group.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.6
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11-12 texts and topics.

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Also at ArkMEA Fall In-Service Dan Newbie

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